Hands-of-Faith Holistic Healing Centers® Blog

Cover of "A New Earth: Awakening to Your ...

Close the door to the habits that have been holding you back, change the record, clean the house, and get rid of the dust and dirt.  Stop denying yourself a fair chance.  Stop being who you were, and become who you really are.

Starting today, stop…

  1. Playing it safe. – Have you ever tucked something of value “in a safe place” out of fear that someone might ruin it or steal it from you?  And then one day woke to the realization that you had hid it so well that even YOU couldn’t find it?  If so, then you understand the wisdom of leaving your heart and your dreams in the wide open.  To reach for what can be, even when we’re doubtful.  To let go of what is lost, even when it’s painful.  To live as though we’re brave, even when we’re fearful.  These are the trials we face…

View original post 812 more words

Lessons From the End of a Marriage

If you missed my interview with Debbi Dickinson last week, you can find the mp3 here.  I talk about strategies to move out of victimhood and take charge of your own life.  Enjoy:)

English: Photograph of victory medal

View original post

Writing Your Destiny

Happy 4th of July to American readers!

This is an important day for so many of us Americans, because America has always been a country that values freedom and independence.

On this day of celebration, I also want to mention a strength of American character that we don’t always remember.  At our best, Americans are not just masters of independence, we are also masters of interdependence.  We care about the whole world, not just America.

My family experienced this gift of interdependence this week, when so many of you kindly sent well wishes and prayers from around the world for our little Lhasa Apso Ginger, who is doing much better now.  I believe the energy you sent made a difference!  I’ll share an update about her in another post.

Today, I want to remember our deep strengths of interdependence in not only America, but most places in the world.  The majority of us care about family…

View original post 445 more words

Mark Bittman on what’s wrong with what we eat

In this fiery and funny talk, New York Times food writer Mark Bittman weighs in on what’s wrong with the way we eat now (too much meat, too few plants; too much fast food, too little home cooking), and why it’s putting the entire planet at risk.

Why you should listen to him:

Although Mark Bittman never formally trained as a chef, his pursuits as a curious and tenacious foodie have made him a casual culinary master. His weekly New York Times food column, The Minimalist, meshes accessible and inexpensive ingredients with “anyone-can” cooking techniques to produce exceedingly delicious dishes. Bittman’s funny, friendly attitude and trademark informal approach to food-craft extend to his blockbuster TV programs (which retain delays and mishaps that other producers would edit out), his blog,Bitten, and ambitious cookbooks, like How to Cook Everything and The Best Recipes in the World.

After a decade as the “Minimalist,” Bittman has emerged a respected spokesperson on all things edible: He’s concerned about the ecological and health impacts of our modern diet, which he characterizes as overwhelmingly meat-centered and hooked on fast food. His criticism has the world listening: His revolutionary How to Cook Everything Vegetarian (sequel toHow to Cook Everything), is a bestseller, and his memorable talk at the 2007 EG Conference (available now on TED.com) delivered a stinging condemnation of the way we eat now. A subsequent New York Times article pursued the same argument.

Bittman’s newest book, Food Matters, explores the link between our eating habits and the environment, offering an accessible plan for a planet-friendly diet.

Cover of "Food Matters: A Guide to Consci...

Cover via Amazon

Dean Ornish: Help the body heal itself

Dean Ornish talks about simple, low-tech and low-cost ways to take advantage of the body’s natural desire to heal itself.

Why you should listen to him:

Dr. Dean Ornish wants you to live longer, and have more fun while you’re at it. He’s one of the leading voices in the medical community promoting a balanced, holistic approach to health, and proving that it works. The author of Eat More, Weigh Less and several other best-selling books, Ornish is best known for his lifestyle-based approach to fighting heart disease.

His research at the Preventive Medicine Research Institute (the nonprofit he founded) clinically demonstrated that cardiovascular illnesses — and, most recently prostate cancer — can be treated and even reversed through diet and exercise. These findings (once thought to be physiologically implausible) have been widely chronicled in the US media, including Newsweek,for which Ornish writes a column. The fifty-something physician, who’s received many honors and awards, was chosen by LIFE Magazine as one of the most influential members of his generation. Among his many pursuits, Ornish is now working with food corporations to help stop America’s obesity pandemic from spreading around the globe.

“Instead of trying to motivate [patients] with the ‘fear of dying,’ Ornish reframes the issue. He inspires a new vision of the ‘joy of living’ — convincing them they can feel better, not just live longer.”

Fast Company

Cover of "Eat More, Weigh Less"

Cover of Eat More, Weigh Less

Jill Bolte Taylor’s stroke of insight

Jill Bolte Taylor got a research opportunity few brain scientists would wish for: She had a massive stroke, and watched as her brain functions — motion, speech, self-awareness — shut down one by one. An astonishing story.

Why you should listen to her:

One morning, a blood vessel in Jill Bolte Taylor’s brain exploded. As a brain scientist, she realized she had a ringside seat to her own stroke. She watched as her brain functions shut down one by one: motion, speech, memory, self-awareness …

Amazed to find herself alive, Taylor spent eight years recovering her ability to think, walk and talk. She has become a spokesperson for stroke recovery and for the possibility of coming back from brain injury stronger than before. In her case, although the stroke damaged the left side of her brain, her recovery unleashed a torrent of creative energy from her right. From her home base in Indiana, she now travels the country on behalf of the Harvard Brain Bank as the “Singin’ Scientist.”

“How many brain scientists have been able to study the brain from the inside out? I’ve gotten as much out of this experience of losing my left mind as I have in my entire academic career.”

Jill Bolte Taylor

Brené Brown: The power of vulnerability

Brené Brown studies human connection — our ability to empathize, belong, love. In a poignant, funny talk at TEDxHouston, she shares a deep insight from her research, one that sent her on a personal quest to know herself as well as to understand humanity. A talk to share.

Why you should listen to her:

Brené Brown is a research professor at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work. She has spent the past ten years studying vulnerability, courage, authenticity, and shame. She spent the first five years of her decade-long study focusing on shame and empathy, and is now using that work to explore a concept that she calls Wholeheartedness. She poses the questions:

How do we learn to embrace our vulnerabilities and imperfections so that we can engage in our lives from a place of authenticity and worthiness? How do we cultivate the courage, compassion, and connection that we need to recognize that we are enough – that we are worthy of love, belonging, and joy?

Read the TED Blog’s Q&A with Brené Brown >>

“Brené Brown is an absolute legend. This is groundbreaking – not in terms of peoples awareness of these subjects and what they mean… But in these messages enhanced communication made accessible to a wider audience on this level. I have a jumbled up jigsaw in front of me with pieces I’ve been putting together my whole life- and Brene Brown has just connected so many pieces. This makes so much sense on so many levels. Really awesome stuff. I will watch this a few times and recommend it to people!”

jakesandersonaudio on YouTube

Steve Jobs: How to live before you die

At his Stanford University commencement speech, Steve Jobs, CEO and co-founder of Apple and Pixar, urges us to pursue our dreams and see the opportunities in life’s setbacks — including death itself.

Why you should listen to him:

The pundits of Silicon Valley have a term for Steve Jobs’ charisma: the reality distortion field. But the truth is, most of us like living in Jobs’ reality, whereexquisite design and sheer utility make for some addictively usable tools.

Jobs’ famous persuasive power was equalled by his creativity and business brilliance — apparent in legendary hardware and software achievementsacross three decades of work. The Macintosh computer (which brought the mouse-driven, graphical user interface to prominence), Pixar Animation Studios (which produced Toy Story, the first fully-3D-animated feature film), the iPod, the iPhone, the iPad all owe credit to Jobs’ leadership and invention.

Jobs battled a rare form of pancreatic cancer — adding to an epic life story that mirrors the story of Apple itself: ever the underdog, ever the spectacular success. In August 2011 he stepped down as Apple’s CEO, remaining as Chairman of the Board. He died on October 5, 2011.

“The past decade in business belongs to Jobs.”     Fortune Magazine